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Iowa State Announces First Ever 10 Win Football Season

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Iowa State joins elite company by awarding themselves victories.

NCAA Football: Liberty Bowl-Iowa State vs Memphis Justin Ford-USA TODAY Sports

After a 2017 season featuring one of the best teams in Cyclone history, Iowa State athletic director Jamie Pollard announced in a press conference this morning that the university intends recognize both the Kansas State and Oklahoma State games as wins, propelling the team to its first ever 10-win season.

In light of Central Florida’s decision to recognize themselves as the 2017 National Champions, President Wintersteen and I have come to the agreement to properly honor the 2017 football teams’ accomplishments. Given the precarious circumstances of the end of the Oklahoma State game, and the complete f***ing bull....poo....at the end of the Kansas State game, we have elected to recognize both of the games as victories. As such, we are proud to congratulate the 2017 Cyclone Football Team on the program’s first ever 10 win season.” - Jamie Pollard

After an undefeated regular season and an AAC conference championship, UCF took down Auburn 34-27 in the Peach Bowl to finish the season unbeaten. Upset at the playoff committee’s decision to exclude them from the playoff in favor of Alabama and Georgia, two teams which Auburn beat this season, the university has elected to declare themselves National Champions, going so far as to plan a championship parade, hang a banner in the stadium, and pay staff members championship contract bonuses.

Schools declaring themselves champions, even many years later, is far from unprecedented, and was somewhat common before the BCS era. Alabama claims 16 national titles, but at least seven of them are easily disputed. Just a few years ago, Oklahoma State made up their own national title...from 63 YEARS AGO in 1945. In 1950, 1951, 1953, 1960, and 1964, the national champion, decided by the Associated Press before the bowl games, actually LOST their bowl games just a couple weeks later. Oklahoma, Tennessee, Maryland, Minnesota, and Alabama all claim titles in those years, respectively.